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World Class Training Centre

Did you know that Jindabyne will soon have a World Class Ski and Snowboard Training Centre?  The 5 million dollar complex had the Development Application passed by The Snowy Monaro Council back in August 2020 and Stage 1 is well under way!

 

The NSTC (National Snowsport Training Centre) will attract winter sports athletes from around the world and put Jindabyne firmly on the map internationally in the Winter Sports Development world.

 

As the name suggests the high-performance airbag jump is for Snow Australia’s elite athletes with access restricted to OWIA (Olympic Winter Institute and NSWIS (NSW institute of sport) athletes and selected Snow Australia Emerging Talent Program athletes.

 

However, a smaller “progression” airbag jump is part of Stage 2 of the development and will have two smaller take-offs of four metres and seven metres. The progression airbag is targeted to resort pathway programs like Perisher’s Winter Sports Club and Thredbo’s Mountain Academy.

 

The centre is located at the Jindabyne Sport and Recreation Centre along the Barry Way and will be open all year round, enabling our athlete’s to be at their peak at all times.  The construction of the dry slope airbag jump and the upgrades to the Sport and Rec centre (Stage 1) is a significant step towards establishing a permanent base for snow sport in Australia and will allow athletes access 365 days of the year.

 

Minister for Sport Geoff Lee said the NSW Government is committed to improving the quality and quantity of sports infrastructure in regional NSW.

 

“The dry slope at the National Snowsports Training Centre is going to give Australia’s best athletes the chance to train in their own backyard 365 days a year,” Mr Lee said.

 

“This project is part of a sports infrastructure construction boom across the State that is boosting employment in regional NSW as part of the NSW Government’s multi-billion-dollar infrastructure pipeline.”

 

The really exciting part of Stage 1 is the airbag technology.  This addition will allow Slope Style and Big Air competitors an outlet to perfect their tricks before going on snow which will greatly reduce the risk of injury. With the facility based in Jindabyne athletes can train on the safety of the dry slope and then just a short drive away they can be on snow.  It is a really appealing option for everyone.

 

There are big things planned for along the Barry Way.  The growth of Jindabyne and the Snowy Monaro area will see increased infrastructure and economic growth.  There is an Education Campus planned for nearby the NSTC comprising of a High School and Primary School hopefully opening in 2023.  The jobs created by these new developments will assure the continual growth of the region.

 

Jindabyne has so much to offer.  Natural beauty, access to two of the biggest ski resorts in Australia, the beautiful Lake Jindabyne, great restaurants, shops and shopping and now the addition of a World Class Training Centre!  With Stage 1 planned to open in 2021 the future looks exceptionally bright for our lucky athletes!

 

Information source: Mountainwatch /NSW Gov media release

kozi main range
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ANNNDDDD THAT’S A WRAP!

We are saying goodbye to Winter 2021.

 

Winter 2021 was not without its challenges.  Unfortunately, we missed many of our regular clients who were not able to come and visit us and our cancellation folder was a bit full.  However, we all got through it as best we could even though it was not easy for many of us on both a personal and professional level.

 

So here we are, at the end of the ski season.  Perisher and Thredbo worked really hard to make the best of the ‘lockdown’ and stayed as open as they could and provided some of the most memorable days for the lucky ones that actually did make it down to see us and managed to get ‘up the hill’.

 

The snow in 2021 was on point with a solid base of over 150cm for most of the season. Both of our premier ski resorts worked hard making snow and delivered some world class groomers and park runs .  We are very lucky here in Jindabyne to have the choice of these amazing facilities less than a 30 minute drive away.

 

We don’t want to make you sad, we want you to be excited for 2022!  While covid has thrown us some curve balls we are all hopeful that learning to live with it and opening our fabulous region in 2022 is on the cards.

 

Don’t forget Epic Australia passes have gone on sale NOW.  You can lock in your season pass right now for a crazy $49 upfront.  If you get in before the 20 October 2021 you will secure your pass for the low price of $859.  An Epic pass gives you access all season long to Perisher, Falls Creek and Hotham and due to recent events Epic Coverage is included with every single 2022 pass so you can plan your visit with confidence, knowing you are protected from unexpected events.

 

While Thredbo Winter Passes are not on sale until a bit closer to next season, they have a range of 24/7 and summer passes coming soon and it is definitely worth a look at their website to find the best deals all year round!

 

 

Back country touring was a highlight of winter 2021 and many a snowshoe was purchased.  If you would like to turn your hand at this next winter, please let us know, we would love to help you out.  The experience is not only stunningly beautiful, but peaceful and serene. It does not have to be hard work, we can help get you out on the snow with very minimal effort.

 

Next year we are also pumped to be welcoming the reopening of Mt Selwyn.  The upgraded facilities promise to cater for everyone with a focus on families and beginning sliders.  How much fun will be had at this beautiful resort!  We are very excited about that.

 

The Jindy Inn was definitely a lot quieter this winter than most, but we have been working hard to make sure we are ready to go when those borders lift (not long now) and we are all shaking off those lock down blues.  Our amazing staff are waiting to welcome you back with open arms and we want to welcome Renae and Jen to the team.  The ladies will be manning reception and look forward to meeting you all very soon.

 

Our focus for 2022 will be working on for Spring/Summer are packages and adventures.  As we all know, it is not JUST about the snow here in Jindabyne and our region has so much to offer.  Have you thought about a helicopter ride? We are teaming up with Snowy Mountain Helicopters to bring you the most amazing experience.  There really is nothing as breathtaking as the Main Range from the air!  Stay tuned for more info on that one!

 

Would you like to hire an e-bike?  Take a picnic hamper to a special site on the lake?  We can organise this all for you, just ask us at reception and keep an eye on our blogs for some more detailed information about our upcoming packages.

 

Jindabyne is the best place in the world in any season and we can’t wait to share our love and passion with you!  See you soon at The Jindy Inn!

touring snowy hydro scheme
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Touring The Snowy Mountains Hydro Electric Scheme

When many people think of The Snowy Mountains, they think of endless outdoor activities such as hiking, biking, horse riding and water skiing. And it is true that Kosciuszko National Park and its surrounds are an outdoor enthusiast’s paradise!

But Australia’s premier alpine national park is also home to the Snowy Mountains Hydro Electric Scheme which is one of the greatest engineering feats of our modern time. The many fascinating historical, social and physical aspects of ‘The Scheme’ provide endless opportunities for sightseeing and learning, and all within the spectacular surrounds of Kosciuszko National Park.

From as early as the 19th century, European explorers saw the opportunity to capture water from the Snowy, Murrumbidgee and Tumut rivers that would naturally flow east of the Great Dividing Range, and divert it west of the divide into the developing farm lands. It wasn’t until early in the 20th century that governments started to seriously contemplate a scheme that could achieve this, and realised that hydro-electricity could also be generated at the same time. They were initially hampered by the fact that it would take the cooperation of two states – Victoria and New South Wales – as well as input and funding from the federal government. Eventually legal, logistical and clerical problems were overcome, advancements were made in engineering, and in 1949, the first blast was detonated at Adaminaby.

The Scheme was completed on time and under budget, which is relatively unheard of today! In the 25 years it took to build, 80km of aqueducts, 140km of tunnels, 16 dams, 7 power stations and 2000km of roads were constructed. Because 98% of The Scheme is underground, there was a lot of tunnelling, often through solid granite, which meant that the work was dirty, wet, noisy, smelly and dangerous. 121 men died on The Scheme, and many say that there were more unreported deaths.

Many of these men were new Australians. Because Australia did not have the expertise at the time for such an ambitious project, many companies from Europe were approached to tender for various parts of the construction. Over 25 years, more than 100,000 men from over 30 different countries worked on The Scheme. Remember that this was immediately post World War II, and one would expect that tensions amongst workers would have been high. Besides some early squabbles between some German and Polish workers, the atmosphere was largely congenial. Most workers were glad to be away from post WWII Europe and were focussed on working hard and enjoying their new life in Australia.

65% of the workforce were from countries including Germany, Greece, Poland, Yugoslavia, Norway, Italy, Ireland and Great Britain. Many men brought their families with them, and the women had to endure the harsh, often sub-zero conditions of the the high alpine. Whole villages were constructed and often included a church, community hall and a school. When work was completed in one area, the whole village was dismantled and moved on to create the next new ‘town.’

Work on The Scheme was finished in 1974, at a cost of $820 million (the equivalent of $6.5 billion today). Many of the European workers stayed on in the Monaro, and some were instrumental in the creation of the modern ski industry of the area. Cooma, which was a sleepy farming town prior to The Scheme, ballooned to a population of over 10,000 replete with bars, night clubs and ‘exotic’ food! It is still said today that Cooma was the birthplace of multicultural Australia.

The Scheme greatly increased the pool of engineering expertise available in Australia, as well as creating several Australian ‘firsts.’ Snowcom was built by the University of Sydney, and was Australia’s first transistorised computer, and the first of a dozen or so computers worldwide. A new system of Rockbolting was developed for use across the ceilings of tunnels that proved to be cheaper and safer than using concrete to support tunnel walls. The Scheme was also the site of the introduction of compulsory seat belts in vehicles, 10 years before the rest of Australia. This quickly proved to be necessary to protect workers from serious injury while operating vehicles in very mountainous terrain.

The Scheme is endlessly fascinating, and while you are in Jindabyne, you can visit museums about The Scheme, sites that are part of the history of The Scheme, and infrastructure that was built during The Scheme and is now managed by Snowy Hydro. The touring route that takes you past most of these places can be seen in the map below. To just drive the whole route would take several hours, so it is best to break it up into a few day trips, and also catch a couple of the sites on the way back home.

 

Places to visit on The Snowy Hydro Scheme

touring snowy hydro scheme

 

Lake Jindabyne and Jindabyne Dam wall

The construction of Jindabyne Dam started in the first year of The Scheme – 1949. A large camp was built beside Jindabyne town to house the workers, and in 1953 the camp ‘closed’ and was moved to Tumut. The Snowy Authority had learnt many lessons from the moving of the town of Adaminaby, and in 1961 planning of new Jindabyne commenced. Only a few houses were moved up to the new site, but the whole cemetery was moved! Other houses were demolished, the bridge was blown up, and in 1967, inundation began. With the damming of the ‘Mighty Snowy’, the river was reduced to 1% of its natural flows; something that would not happen today with our increased environmental awareness.

The Jindabyne Dam wall is 72m high, and the lake is the fourth biggest in The Scheme at nearly 700,000 mega litres. Lobbying from many groups earlier this century, resulted in environmental flows of 27% (of the river’s natural flow) being legislated by government and managed by Snowy Hydro. The plume of water emanating from the dam wall during releases is quite a spectacular sight. There is a great viewing platform on top of the dam wall looking north. When you are driving out of Jindabyne towards Cooma, you can pull off to the right, immediately after the dam wall, and walk back over to the north side of the road to the paved viewing area. Alternatively, you can walk 3km along the dirt track from Poo Bay, just behind the Bowling Club, off Cobbon Cr.

 

Surge Tower

The Waste Point Surge Tank is 13.7km from Jindabyne, and its Surge Tower is a prominent landmark on the Kosciuszko Road. The tank and tower relieve water pressure from the pipeline between Island Bend and Lake Jindabyne. It can be hard to enter the reserve coming from Jindabyne, so it is best to enter on your way back down the hill from Perisher or Charlotte Pass.

 

Island Bend

22km along Kosciuszko Rd from Jindabyne, you will see the turn off to Guthega (Guthega Rd). 5km along this road, you will come to Island Bend Campground. This is the site of the Island Bend township, established in 1952 and demolished in 1966-68. The township was constructed to house the families of men working on the power station at Island Bend and Guthega Dam. There is not much left of the once bustling town that comprised of houses, roads, a community hall and a church. Island bend is also the site of one of the most infamous accidents of The Scheme, where three men were caught in liquid concrete and died.

 

Guthega Dam and Guthega Power Station

At the end of Guthega Rd is the small ski resort village of Guthega (part of Perisher Resort) and Guthega Pondage. The dam at Guthega, on the upper reaches of the Snowy River, was the first in the Scheme to be built. Because it was the first, Australia still lacked some of the engineering expertise required, and the Norwegian company Selmer Engineering won the contract. Selmer had extensive experience in similar projects in Norway, where all power is hydro-electric. The Norwegian workers however were not happy with the conditions they encountered – tents as shelter, no hot showers, and margarine instead of butter! The first electricity of the Scheme was generated at Guthega Power Station in 1955 when the Prime Minister, Robert Menzies, opened the intake valves to start up the turbines. This intentional early production of electricity helped to dispel public doubts about the cost of the project.

 

Snowy Hydro Discovery Centre

In 1997, the NSW government and the Victorian State Electricity Commission joined to form Snowy Hydro Trading in order to sell electricity to the National Energy Market. They were joined in 2000 by the Commonwealth Government, and in 2002, Snowy Hydro was corporatised to form Snowy Hydro Limited which now operates and maintains the Snowy Mountains Scheme; recognised as one of the modern civil engineering wonders of the world.

The Snowy Hydro Discovery Centre is a fabulous facility on the north side of Cooma, which houses an extensive photographic collection, models, exhibits and interactive displays about The Scheme’s engineering, history, water management, power generation, the National Electricity Market and the new Snowy 2.0 project. The knowledgeable staff run Visitor Experience Sessions every half an hour from 8am to 4pm. They also have some of the best coffee in town!

 

Snowy Scheme Museum

Located in Adaminaby, this wholly volunteer created and run museum of the history of The Scheme is a must-see. In three large halls, they have a collection which comprises of machinery, historic vehicles, artworks, photographs, maps, plans, paper records, small tools and equipment, medical equipment and domestic items of The Scheme’s era.

While you are in Adaminaby, you can take a snap in front of the ‘Big Trout’, have lunch at the bakery, and buy local arts and crafts at the CWA shop. You can also see the old bank building that was transported from the old town, and the beautiful St John’s Anglican Church which was relocated brick by brick!

 

Talbingo

Further north west from Adaminaby, along the Snowy Mountains Highway, is the town of Talbingo. In the small shopping centre, you will find a Snowy Hydro display, and 5km past the village is Tumut 3 Power Station – the biggest in The Scheme. You cannot tour Tumut 3, but there are two fantastic viewpoints up a dirt road behind the power station. From the highest viewpoint, you look straight south down the mighty Talbingo Reservior, the southern end of which will be linked to Tantangara Dam via the Snowy 2.0 project.

 

Cabramurra

The Snowy Hydro town of Cabramurra is quite a sight to see. The original camp was constructed in 1951 on the western side of the hill that now houses the lookout. Considering that the prevailing weather systems come from the south west, the more permanent town was built in a more ‘sheltered’ location. The roofs of the houses are a steep single pitch facing south west, which not only protects from the harsh winds, but also allows for the accumulated snow to quickly slide off.

Cabramurra has a visitor information centre, souvenir shop, café and bistro that are open to the public. It is definitely worth a stop on your way between Kiandra in the east, and Khancoban or Tumbarumba in the west.

 

Murray 1 and Murray 2

The visitor centre at Murray 1 Power Station has been undergoing renovations for the last few years. In the interim, Murray 2 Power Station near Khancoban has been hosting visitors and providing a very informative and interesting tour of the facility. Tours are free and are held at 11am and 2pm daily.

Touring The Scheme has something for everyone, so come and see us to experience The Scheme for yourself. Enjoy the attractions of one of the modern engineering wonders of the world, and all while touring through one of the most spectacular national parks in Australia!

 

 

 

Resources Used

http://www.migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au/exhibition/newaustralia/building-the-snowy/index.html

http://www.smec.com/70years/portfolio/snowy-mountains-hydroelectric-scheme/

https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/heritageapp/ViewHeritageItemDetails.aspx?ID=2410234

https://www.snowyhydro.com.au/our-energy/hydro/the-history/

Raymond, R (1999) A vision for Australia – The Snowy Mountains Scheme 1949-1999

 

 

 

 

wombat
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Wombat Found Guilty In A Series Of Home-Invasions

A rogue wombat dubbed ‘Mr Bat’ has been detained after terrorising a community for 12 months in a series of home invasions via cat flaps.

 

The furry animal’s rampage through Longford, a small close-knit community in Tasmania, ended on Monday when authorities managed to catch him.

 

For a year, Mr Bat has entered homes and ransacked them. The looter would raid fridges, make beds out of cushions, tunnel under fences and just before exiting the premises he would eat all the cat/dog food.

 

One of the first clues in the “who done it” investigation of the home intruder came from Bev McGee who was first visited by Mr. Bat about a year ago.

 

Mr. Bat made his way into the back entrance of her house where a couch was set up. He pulled off all the cushions he didn’t like, and made a comfy bed for the night amongst his chosen cushions.

 

“We got up the next morning and there’s cushions and rugs strewn everywhere and muddy paw prints on the cushions,” she said.

 

As Mr. Bat got more confident in his pursuits and started coming into more resident’s homes, eventually he was spotted in the act. In the middle of the night local residents were awoken by the sound of rustling noises inside their homes only to be greeted by a wombat in the hallway or at their fridge snacking on lettuce and carrots.

 

Northern Midlands Councillor Matthew Brooks is one of the many victims who had their home broken into, he told authorities that the male wombat was named Mr. Bat by fellow residents. Mr. Brooks said the wombat was living in council pipes during the day and visiting residents’ after dark, entering homes through cat and dog flaps.

 

Mr. Brooks said his well-manicured lawn was a favourite snack of Mr. Bat’s. He had his first run-in with the wombat 3 months ago when he caught Mr. Bat snacking on his lawn

 

Despite his behavior, Councillor Brooks said the wombat was not aggressive at all and the four-legged thief was ‘quite a cute sight’.

 

It didn’t bother the residents in Longford having the mischievous wombat making himself at home in their small community, however they were all concerned that he may get run over by a car or attacked by a dog. With animal welfare in mind, Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service caught the wombat and relocated him to Cradle Mountain where there is an abundance of fellow wombat buddies.

 

Mr. Bat is now living at Cradle Mountain, but he has left behind a trail of ruined pillows, empty pet bowls, raided fridges, muddy paws and fond memories.

Mr Bat
A Day In The Life Of Bubba Rosso
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A Day In The Life Of Bubba Rosso

[pexyoutube pex_attr_src=”https://youtu.be/5XsQiKN0Y_U” pex_attr_width=”900″][/pexyoutube]

 

Meet Claire + Eric’s latest wildlife rescue – Bubba Rosso.

Bubba Rosso’s mum was unfortunately hit by a car on the road up to Guthega [more than likely when tourists where told to evacuate national park due to bushfires in the region] and was rescued from mum’s pouch by some local firie’s [who also named him].

At just 250 grams [approximately 3.5 months old] he came to us covered in dirt but was in good health. After just 2.5 weeks in our care he already weighs almost 500 grams and is getting more stronger and determined by the day.

At this time in his life the most important thing he needs is lots of sleep, to be fed every 4 hours and kept in a quiet and calm environment to give him every opportunity to grow, become strong and thrive in his new home. It is also crucial for his well-being to spend as much quiet time with him-  giving him hugs close to the heart – as the soft sound of the heart-beat is very reassuring for all baby animals.

Being un-furred, he can not regulate his own body temperature yet so his bedding is constantly monitored using a thermostat to ensure it sits around 29-32 degrees – this can be adjusted with extra bedding, a heat pad and sometimes a hot water bottle. Because the heat-pad can dry out his skin he needs to be oiled once a day.

The purpose for caring for all wild-life is to give them a second chance. A chance for them to return to the wild where they can live out their natural lives. Bubba Rosso will be encouraged to live as much of a normal wombat life as he can, without becoming a pet, as the main goal with all wild-life entrusted in our care is to always ensure that we are looking and working towards their release.  As cute as he is, we do not want Bubba Rosso to fully imprint on us, as this can jeopardize his life. The best way to ensure he doesn’t get to attached to us is to buddy him up with another wombat [or 2 or 3]  of similar size and age – this will probably happen in 3 months or so.

Wombats are not fully independent until 2 years of age – so he has about 20 months with us [along with his fellow wombat buddy – whoever that may be]. We will soft release him on our property, which involves having him in a fenced area with a burrow, feed and fellow wombat buddies. Over time the gate to this fenced off area is kept open and the wombats can come and go as they please. Eventually they find their own burrow and move out of the enclosed area, and depending on the wombat we may never see them again [which is very sad for us humans – however we are happy for their independence] or they may wander up and around the house to say hello every now and then, with some females even bringing their babies with them.